History

Click to Enlarge

Thomas Kennedy Snr - Founder of Glenfield and Kennedy and Inventor of Worlds First Water Meter

Click to Enlarge

Thomas Kennedy  – The major growth period of Glenfield & Kennedy was between 1871 and 1904, under the direction of Thomas Kennedy (nephew of Thomas Kennedy, senior).  Under his influence ‘The glen’ became one of the most important hydraulic engineering concern in Britain, with substantial export orders to most parts of the world.

Click to Enlarge

Ariel view of Glenfield & Kennedy Works which covered 26 acres as well as employing 2600 workforce

Click to Enlarge

A Bay in the Modern West (Light) Engineering Department at Glenfield & Kennedy Works

Click to Enlarge

General Engineering Department at Glenfield & Kennedy Works

Click to Enlarge

Heavy Engineering Bay at Glenfield & Kennedy Works

Click to Enlarge

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd Works in June 1942.  The man in the lighter coloured suit on the King and Queens right is believed to be Sir Alex Walker.   The man talking with the King is Bruce Ball Junior and the man in the uniform at the King’s left is Cowan Douglas

Click to Enlarge

The visit of their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to the Glenfield & Kennedy Works 1942

Click to Enlarge

The locomotive built for Glenfield Works in 1902

Click to Enlarge

A more recent picture of the Locomotive used at Glenfield Works

Click to Enlarge

Apprentice Turners at Glenfield & Kennedy Works

Click to Enlarge

This was a special edition of the Glenfield Gazette detailing the company’s contribution to the war effort.
Amongst the activities they were involved in was the design and manufacture of flood gates for the London Underground, construction of hydraulic machinery used in the manufacture of armaments, manufacture of flood water ejectors and also the breech mechanism for the Six Pounder Anti-Tank Gun.
The contribution of Glenfield and Kennedy to the war effort was acknowledged by a visit from King George Vi and Queen Elizabeth in 1942

Click to Enlarge

Water meters measure the volume of water passing through them and it was this product, accurate to within one percent that made Glenfield & Kennedy famous throughout the world.
The original one was designed in 1824 by Thomas Kennedy with the help of local, Kilmarnock, clockmaker John Cameron.  Water coming into the meter is directed by a small valve either above or below a piston in a cylinder of known volume.  The rise and fall of the piston, apart from expelling the measured quantities of water, also drives a counting mechanism and recording dials.

Click to Enlarge

This meter has its cover removed so that the working parts can be seen.  Water coming into the meter is directed by a small valve either above or below a piston in a cylinder of known volume.  The rise and fall of the piston apart from expelling the measured quantities of water also drives a counting mechanism and recording dials.  This mechanism is missing from this meter but would be viewed through a small window.

Click to Enlarge

This was one of Kilmarnock’s public drinking fountains which was produced at the Glenfield works in town.  This design was patented by Thomas Kennedy and carried the public notice "Keep the Pavement Dry"

Click to Enlarge

This plaque celebrates wave making machinery which was deisgned and manufactured by Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. for the new Burgh of Kilmarnock Public Baths & Swimming Pond.  They were opened on the 5th October 1940

Click to Enlarge

Sample Glenfield Kinetic Air Relief Valve

Click to Enlarge

Glenfield and Kennedy Ltd Fire Hydrant located in Side Street in Ireland.  Notice the detail to artwork in casting at top of Hydrant

Click to Enlarge

Glenfield & Kennedy Single Cylinder double Acting Water Pump (c1905) Glenfield and Kennedy Ltd Single cylinder double-acting, horizontal, open-crank water pump originally installed to provide drinking water for Aldeburgh in Suffolk. It completed service in 1970. The electric motor donated with the pump was not the original form of motive power which remains unknown. Bore: 8", Stoke 15". Donated by the Museum of East Anglian Life, Stowmarket, Suffolk and currently situated at the Waterworks Museum Hereford.

Click to Enlarge

Glenfield & Kennedy Peebles-type Sand Washer (c1901) Glenfield and Kennedy Ltd Portable machine for cleaning sand on building sites and most particularly at water treatment works. The soiled sand, which forms the top layer of a slow sand filter, is skimmed off and treated in the washer to clean and separate the sand according to grain size and detritus. this particular model is located at the Waterworks Museum, Hereford.


Glenfield Valves Limited

Telephone+44 (0) 1563 521150

Email

BSI

SABS

WRAS

AWWA

British Water

 

Powered by Etomite CMS.